Special Programs


石头汤
石头汤
The Foundation initiates and launches special programs and activities in order to support its grants more effectively. Through actively participating in the special programs, the Foundation has gained better understanding of the societal needs and operational landscape. We aim to broaden our knowledge base so to meet and complement the evolving needs of our recipients.

Our flagship program, the Stone Soup Happy Reading Alliance (“SSHRA”) was founded in 2007 in Hefei, Anhui Province. It is operated independently by the Foundation. We aim to set it up as a local exemplar for school reading and libraries development in Mainland China through our long-term commitment.

http://www.cysff.org/reports/2014-2015/en.html
The Alliance Stories
Hefei Teacher Librarian Association
Librarian Training Program
The Alliance Stories
 
Ten years ago, the Foundation and schools in Hefei began to promote reading with the mutual vision of creating a high-quality reading environment so that children can enjoy the pleasure of reading. Over the decade, this wonderful dream gradually took shape and came true, and is now in full bloom.

Over the years, the Foundation and the Alliance have continued to cook this pot of “Reading Stone Soup” together, all along using the same recipe, expectation and mindset from day one. As the soup boiled, many happy, touching and thought-provoking situations. We would like to take this opportunity to share some of the stories here, so that we can all experience the changes that reading has brought to the protagonists.

Hefei Teacher Librarian Association
 
Thanks to the leadership and guidance of the Education Bureau of Baohe District (EB), the Foundation, the Hong Kong Teacher Librarian Association, the Taiwan Teacher Librarian Association and reading promotion experts, the Hefei Teacher Librarian Association (HFTLA) has, since its establishment in 2013, not only developed robustly but also built up a core team of talented local trainers to help disseminate professional knowledge in school library management and their shared belief in reading.

During this time, with the HFTLA has been widely recognized, Ms. Che Qian and Mr. Chen Jun of the HFTLA took part in the adjudication of the “Best Bookstore in Anhui Province” Competition in May 2016. Additionally, the HFTLA was invited by the Xinhua Bookstore to co-organized a bookshop seminar on how to develop and cultivate a reading habit for children.

In 2016, at the invitation of the local Education Bureau and schools, the trainers of the HFTLA went to Changfeng County in Hefei, Majiang County in Guizhou, and Shanghai to conduct training on creating a reading environment and school library management. Also during the summer, the HFTLA organized a three-day open training course for more than 50 principals and teachers from all over China. As the school curricula are constantly adjusted and refined, more and more teacher librarians are joining the team of trainers at the HFTLA, solidly fueling the development of the HFTLA.

The Second Teacher Librarian Training Program
 
The 2nd Teacher Librarian Training Program commenced in March 2016. The program spans 20 months and comprises of 10 modules, with 15 learning hours assigned to each module. The successful completion of the first program in June 2014 caught the attention of the EB, and upon their invitation, the 2nd Diploma Course is managed jointly by the Foundation and the EB.

Using the courses from the 1st training program as a basis, adjustments were made to the 2nd course materials to ensure that it better matches local situations and experiences. This includes the addition of a new topic about the role of teacher librarians and resources centers, and site visits to various Stone Soup Happy Reading Alliance schools were also arranged. The modifications aim to strengthen the localization of the course contents and practical operability of the course. The 10 modules are listed as below:

The Role of Teacher Librarians and Resources Centers of Schools
Case Study:
Site Visits to Stone Soup Happy Reading Alliance Schools and Primary and Secondary Schools in Hong Kong
Managing Library Catalogues
The School Library and Creating a Reading Culture at School
Information Technology for the Library
Effective Use of Library Design and Space
Investigative Learning
Bilingual Information Sourcing Services and Promotion
Promoting Library Services
Visit to Taiwan

Besides continuing to invite teacher librarians from Hong Kong and Taiwan as trainers, graduates from the 1st program were also invited to participate as assistant trainers to assist with the teaching. So far, 13 teachers have participated. Not only do they assist the lecturers in a competent way, they are also able to share their own experience of how they have applied and implemented the training materials in real life. This sharing is particularly powerful as it shows that theory can be put into practice.

 
Visit to Hong Kong
From November 13 to 19, 2016, a delegation of 21 top students and principals from Baohe District, Hefei visited Hong Kong. The aim is to learn from primary and secondary schools in Hong Kong on how to establish a school library or the function of the library to support subject integration, and also to experience the practical application of the program contents in Hong Kong. During the seven-day trip, the delegates visited a number of institutions including two secondary schools, six primary schools, the Hong Kong Central Library, Bring Me A Book Hong Kong, and Feng Zikai Chinese Children’s Picture Book Award.

Towards the end of the visit, the delegates conducted small-group panel discussions to reflect upon to recap what they learned from the visit. The topics of the discussions include: 1. strategies for the development of library collections; 2. studies on library designs; 3. reading activities; 4. library and teaching of academic subjects; 5. role and positioning of teacher librarians.

Click here for delegates’ comments on the visit and summary materials on specific topics: http://www.cysffreading.org/news/1250
 
Insightful Training Sessions
Insightful Training Sessions
During the course of the training program, the trainers use a lot of different ways to insert fun elements into the modules. The classroom is often filled with laughter, excitement and lots of questions and discussions! For example, as part of the module for “The School Library and Creating a Reading Culture at School”, the students, using Lego bricks to build the stage and characters, put on a storytelling performance to demonstrate how teacher librarians make use of library resources to create a reading culture in the school campus. Before the show, group members worked together to complete a simple script and character design. Thanks to the thoughtful trainers, the participants are able to learn in a relaxed and entertaining environment.

Storytelling Workshop
 
“I never knew that a story can be told in such a lively and interesting way!” This was the unanimous feedback from the teachers who attended Julie’s “Storytelling Workshop”.

In November 2016, the Foundation invited Ms. Julie Fowlkes to deliver three storytelling training workshops for local teachers in Hefei and Changfeng, attracting almost 100 participants.

Many teachers shared in their comments that the part they enjoyed the most was listening to the stories told by Julie. It seems that listening to stories is something that adults enjoy as much as kids do, and has nothing to do with their age.

So, how can you tell a story in a lively, attractive way? Julie’s trick is very simple: rather than imparting knowledge or delivering life lessons, guide the kids into the story, show them the fun of the story and pictures books, and make them feel interested.

Ms. Wang Jingjing (from Huashanlu Primary School, Hefei) shared her experience as a teacher and parent: begin with the children’s interests, insist on reading them stories, and give them the books they like. The nourishments they take in from reading usually exceed what teachers and parents can imagine. This process is neither utilitarian nor artificial.

With over 40 years of experience in educating children, Julie worked as a teacher and reading expert in many public schools in California, and then spent over 30 years conducting trainings for teachers and educators across the USA. In order to become a “master storyteller”, Julie recommends that teachers learn the “pre-reading, during-reading and post-reading” techniques and most importantly, to constantly practice and apply the techniques to storytelling.

Storytelling Workshop

Reading tips
Reading tips
Learning English through Picture Books –
English Teacher Training Program
 
This Program, which started in July 2013 and concluded in August 2016, aimed to show how English can be efficiently and interestingly taught with picture books. When the program launched three years ago, many local English teachers had never seen a picture book before. Now, with the support of the EB, we are excited to see a lot more quality English reading materials in the libraries and classrooms of the Hefei schools.

Ms. Percie Wong is the principal trainer for this program and helped plan all the training sessions. At Bring Me A Book Hong Kong, she conducts the “Teachers who Enlighten Kids” training for parents and the “Train the Trainer Workshop” for teachers and social workers. She is a seasoned trainer and speaker. She often tells English stories in public libraries and community centers in Hong Kong.

Learning English through Picture Books – English Teacher Training Program
“As a trainer, I faced a huge challenge. On the day I arrived in Hefei, Cindy Qin, China Special Program Manager of the Foundation, had a discussion with me, and we both believed that the teachers in Hefei were reluctant to use picture books to tell stories. I had to do whatever I could to enhance their understanding, which was the objective of the trip. Therefore, in each training seminar, we held a large number of discussions in order to strengthen the effectiveness of training, including class observations, storytelling demonstrations, and on-the-spot guidance by education expert, Julie Fowlkes.

As I had reported, the teachers had little motivation in adopting extra pedagogical methods. In addition, they were worried that if extra teaching were added, students would not be able to maintain their academic results. They are reluctant to make changes. If extra teaching could not result in immediate and noticeable improvement in students’ academic performance, the teachers would rather keep the status quo.

Both the teachers in Hefei and I benefited greatly from this training. The class demonstrations improved the learning curve of the pre-selected potential teachers and enhanced their reasoning abilities. Also, the pedagogical skills and storytelling techniques of those participating teachers were specifically enhanced. It can be said that the English teachers’ initiatives in self-learning paved the way for the success of this training. Undoubtedly, this Project can be handed over to the EB for further development.

With the new academic year, the training finally yielded positive results. I noticed that budding teachers shared their amazing teaching results in their WeChat Friends Circle. It appears that they have at last started to put what they have learnt into practice. This, without doubt, signals a good start for their development from which students will stand to benefit.” – Ms. Percie Wong, Trainer of English Teacher Training Program

Click here for the highlights of the Training Program and a summary of the Summer English Training Camp 2016: http://www.cysffreading.org/news/1244

朗读贴士Reading Tips
Before you read aloud
  • Look over the book. If you’re familiar with the book, you’ll read it better.
  • Start with the cover. Read aloud the title and the names of the author and illustrator.
  • Remind the children of other books they may know by the same author or illustrator.
  • Ask what the cover illustration might tell them about the book.
  • Discuss how the topic of the book relates to children’s lives.
  • Suggest some things to look and listen for while you read.

As you read
  • Be silly, dramatic and have fun!
  • Use different voices for the different characters.
  • Raise and lower your voice to fit the mood or action.
  • Let the child to turn the book around.
  • Discuss the pictures with children.
  • Move your finger under the words or pictures to highlight the special words and points.

Stop now and then to…
  • Add information or rephrase something to help the children understand.
  • Explain the meaning of a new word.
  • Ask the children to predict what will happen next.
  • Ask the children to memorize what had happened previously.
  • Ask about a character’s thoughts and actions.
  • Encourage and praise children.
  • Repeat the special words.
  • Share your own ideas and reactions to the story.

Encourage the children to participate…
  • Invite them to add sound effects.
  • Pause to let them fill in an end rhyme or familiar phrase.

After you read
  • Ask the children to tell you something that they like from the story.
  • Ask the children to put themselves in the place of a character.
  • Encourage them to give opinions about the book.
  • Have them relate the book to their own experiences.
  • Repeat reading the stories they like.

Adapted from Reading Is Fundamental and The Reading Teacher

Principals Chapter
Taihulu Primary School
Ms. Jin Yan
Every Twinkling Dandelion
I first learned about The Chen Yet Sen Family Foundation when my school participated in the “Good Books for All” program in 2007. We have been involved in the program since then – my school is now one of the veteran schools of the Stone Soup Happy Reading Alliance, and I have had the privilege of witnessing how children has evolved as a result of reading.

The following are extracts from Candlelight, a magazine created and published by the Class of 2015 as a tribute for their primary school:



Every Twinkling Dandelion
The magazine is very comprehensive. It comes with an issue number, foreword, table of contents, QR code and price. Most wonderfully, the original short poem written by the students for each teacher fully captures the characteristics of each academic subject. For example, mathematic related terms like shapes or geometry were used to describe the math teacher, and language and grammatical terms were used to depict the English teacher. This is the type of pleasant surprise that children who have been immersed in a reading environment can deliver.
Taihulu Primary School (THLPS) consists mainly of students from migrant working families who are as innocent, pure and down-to-earth as wild dandelions which are ordinary, but resilient. Unfortunately, the parents of these little dandelions are busy making a living and have little time to spare for their children, and the inadequacy in family education has to be compensated almost entirely by the school. Therefore, our staff unanimously put effort into creating a suitable reading environment for children by setting up various reading platforms to guide students to learn through reading.

Today, the library has become the students most beloved location in the school. In the past decade, our library has transformed from what was initially a little book storage area to a warm, comfortable and well-equipped library. The students of THLPS have witnessed the library’s four upgrades and seen it develop into a library that can host a range of reading activities. Reading has become a daily activity for the students.
Amongst the many reading events, the student’s favorite is the library’s flagship project, the “Dandelion Mini-forum”, which has been in place for five years. It originated from a structured inter-class debate on various topics such as “Read to see the world”, “Find out more about couplets” and “Should one chase after stars?”. The topics stimulated the children’s thinking and broke their silence. We were astonished by their active participation in the discussions, and it became obvious that the function of the library must change. It should not only be a place for storing and borrowing books; it should also be a resource center for all academic subjects, for holding reading classes, and for sharing reading experiences. As a result, the Dandelion Mini-forum became a platform for our “little bookworms” to express their opinions.

Over the few years, the Mini-forum has attracted a large flock of little “bookworms” who love reading and enjoy sharing. Each semester, students line up at the librarian office to make reservations to host forums. They choose and confirm their own topics, design their own posters, announce and promote their own forums, and set their own format. Here, these little bookworms brainstorm together to generate even more topics and ideas. Some of these topics include “How much do you know about currency war?”, “The World War II situation”, “The decline and fall of the Qing Dynasty”, “The myth of UFO” …
Every Thursday from 4:00 to 4:40 pm, the second floor of the library is crowded with children, turning the place into a world in which they take the lead. Their innocent faces look like dandelions blooming in the spring wind. Chen Ruoyu, a student who reads with exceptional depth and started reading Currency War in grade 5. Yet, he has difficulty in expressing himself. His class teacher therefore encouraged him to host a forum. The first time he stood before his junior schoolmates, Chen stuttered and did not even dare look straight at his audience. However, when I attended his forum in the second semester, he totally transformed. He spoke with eloquence and interacted often with his audience. It was miraculous! Now in its fifth year, the forums are covering more extensive topics, and their hosts are no longer confined to senior students. Even parents have been actively taking part in these forums with their children.

While I was writing this article, I was invited by Ms. Liu Qin, a teacher from Class 5(1), to write a foreword for the class publication Growth. As I flipped through the children’s writing, I felt especially proud of the effect that reading has had on them! If these 1,100 children from THLPS are dandelions ready to take flight, then reading, which is ubiquitous, is the rain and dew that nourish them.
Amongst the many reading events, the student’s favorite is the library’s flagship project, the “Dandelion Mini-forum”, which has been in place for five years. It originated from a structured inter-class debate on various topics such as “Read to see the world”, “Find out more about couplets” and “Should one chase after stars?”. The topics stimulated the children’s thinking and broke their silence. We were astonished by their active participation in the discussions, and it became obvious that the function of the library must change. It should not only be a place for storing and borrowing books; it should also be a resource center for all academic subjects, for holding reading classes, and for sharing reading experiences. As a result, the Dandelion Mini-forum became a platform for our “little bookworms” to express their opinions.

Over the few years, the Mini-forum has attracted a large flock of little “bookworms” who love reading and enjoy sharing. Each semester, students line up at the librarian office to make reservations to host forums. They choose and confirm their own topics, design their own posters, announce and promote their own forums, and set their own format. Here, these little bookworms brainstorm together to generate even more topics and ideas. Some of these topics include “How much do you know about currency war?”, “The World War II situation”, “The decline and fall of the Qing Dynasty”, “The myth of UFO” …
Every Thursday from 4:00 to 4:40 pm, the second floor of the library is crowded with children, turning the place into a world in which they take the lead. Their innocent faces look like dandelions blooming in the spring wind. Chen Ruoyu, a student who reads with exceptional depth and started reading Currency War in grade 5. Yet, he has difficulty in expressing himself. His class teacher therefore encouraged him to host a forum. The first time he stood before his junior schoolmates, Chen stuttered and did not even dare look straight at his audience. However, when I attended his forum in the second semester, he totally transformed. He spoke with eloquence and interacted often with his audience. It was miraculous! Now in its fifth year, the forums are covering more extensive topics, and their hosts are no longer confined to senior students. Even parents have been actively taking part in these forums with their children.

While I was writing this article, I was invited by Ms. Liu Qin, a teacher from Class 5(1), to write a foreword for the class publication Growth. As I flipped through the children’s writing, I felt especially proud of the effect that reading has had on them! If these 1,100 children from THLPS are dandelions ready to take flight, then reading, which is ubiquitous, is the rain and dew that nourish them.
Teachers Chapter
Wanghu Primary School, Hefei
Ms. Li Ling (Head Librarian)
My Second Life
after Retirement
The year of 2012 was destined to be an unusual year for me. Not only because I retired that year, but also because of two life-changing events happened during that year.

In January, I lost the person who loved me and whom I loved. What was originally a beautiful and happy family became broken and incomplete all of a sudden. I can never understand why such a modest, amiable and diligent man would pass away so young. It felt like I would not be able to lead a happy, carefree, colorful life ahead… I could not show my sorrow in front of my parents because every teardrop of mine cut into their hearts; nor could I weep in front of my daughter because my grief penetrated her soul. I felt helpless, disoriented and utterly hopeless.

In August, the new Wanghu Primary School campus was completed. Its library needed an administrator. As the new school was situated right next to my home – I could see the school playground through my windows, I came to Wanghu Primary School to work as a library administrator in the hopes of providing myself with some solace.
The education and teaching profession were completely new to me, and I had never heard the term “teacher librarian” before. I had to learn and work from the basics. In September, I received my first training from Ah Jia and Inspector Carrot of the Hung Ni Ba Reading Club, from which I learnt about library information I was never aware of before. I learned about call numbers and ISBN, and the operation procedure of the library. This was a very meaningful experience. Over the past four years, from understanding the library software and system, to knowing them inside out, I worked as I learned and learned as I worked. The comment given by Inspector Carrot, Ah Jia and the software manager about my school’s library was: the best user with the least number of errors committed.


From the first book entry to circulation; book shelving to setting up a reading environment; holding reading sessions for students to teaching library courses… I studied theories and explored through practice. I am a happy learner.
I participated in the first 18-month extensive teacher librarian training session in Baohe district and learned a great deal from it. I gained new knowledge and had the opportunity to study with great teachers from Hong Kong and Taiwan. Not only did they offer guidance in professional knowledge, they also exhibited the virtues of kindness, courtesy and modesty.

Apart from performing my core duties at work, I have also conducted multiple training sessions and shared my firsthand experience to assist those in need. In 2016 alone, I participated thrice as Assistant Lecturer in training activities organized by the Foundation, took part in a training program in Guizhou sponsored by the Hefei Teacher Librarian Association, and spoke in six training programs for provincial library administrators (1,800 attendees).

Upon retirement, I initially thought of becoming a full-time housewife. When my husband passed away, I thought it would be hard to find happiness in the future. However, I have drawn sustenance from working in the library, immersing myself in the sea of books, talking and interacting with young children every day. Books have changed me, and the library has renewed my life.
Students Chapter
Qingnianlu Primary School
Wang Mengjuan(Mother)
Zhang Chenhao(Son)
Our Story on Reading

We started parent-child reading when Chenhao was very young, and this habit has continued until now. The result of long-term parent-child reading has been remarkable. I still remember this vividly: Chenhao was in a junior class at a kindergarten. One day after school, Chenhao brought home with him a textbook for the first semester, in which there was a story called ”The Crow and the Pitcher”. Having explained to me in excitement what happened in class that day, Chenhao held the book and started reading out the short story clearly and fluently. I was stunned. With subtle, gradual day-to-day guidance, Chenhao had learned and accumulated considerable vocabulary by that time, and that was perhaps when he started to read in a structured manner. Since he started primary school, he has been exposed to even more books.
What has reading brought for him? Just too much!

Reading is enjoyable. Chenhao often laughs out loud when he reads and is eager to share with family members all the great things that he reads about. When he reads out loud expressively, it is obvious that he enjoys himself. Reading and vocabulary building then becomes a habit that comes to him very naturally.

Reading has broadened his horizon and given him more confidence. He especially love reading about popular science, and often spends a lot of time studying the cosmic structure, what is in the ocean, the relationship between B cells and T cells in the human body, etc. All the other kids say that Chenhao knows everything and is like their teacher. Back in the kindergarten years, he often read stories to other kids during reading time. I remember we once took Chenhao to the mountainous area of Wannan. We saw a rainbow after the rain. Chenhao asked me, “Mum, do you know why a rainbow appears right after it rains?” Looking at the sky with his head high, he said, “After it rains, there is a large amount of water vapors in the air, the reflection of light in the water droplets will result in a spectrum of multi-colored lights formed in the sky.” Such a sophisticated description presented by such a young, innocent voice struck me as a pleasant surprise. On another occasion, Chenhao spotted a tiny snail and was surprised.
 

“There is a spiral pattern on the shell. The spiral pattern of this snail rotates to the left so the snail is a lefty,” Chenhao said happily. I was puzzled, and he explained that, if the spiral pattern on the shell of a snail rotates to the right, then the snail is a righty; otherwise the snail is a lefty, and the probability of that happening is only five percent.

Since he started attending primary school, I recorded everything Chenhao described orally and kept those as audio recordings. To date, I have almost 100 such audio recordings. Chenhao’s Talk Show is his original brand. The recording process, which involved absorbing and then digesting what he read, helped strengthen his abilities in many aspects such as logical thinking, linguistic organization and so on, and should also prove helpful to his writing in the future.

Reading trains us to become more diligent and teaches us that we should not just muddle along but should face everything calmly and seriously. We will gain a sense of contentment during the process. Reading is a shared responsibility between parents and their children.
Students Chapter
Tunxilu Primary School
Wei Jianan(Mother)
Yang Wanjiang(Son)
Impact of Library Courses
on Children


My son just started Primary 1. I had always thought that at his age, it was too early to consider how learning can make an impact on anything, but I have been converted by a conversation between my own son and a guide at the national library.

During a weekend in autumn last year, I went to Tianjin Hospital for a check-up and used the opportunity to bring my son to Beijing for a two day holiday. We casually mentioned that the national library housed all kinds of books, and he insisted on looking up a book called “Plants vs Zombies: A Strategy Guide”. I took him to the library, expecting this to be nothing more than an eye-opening experience since he is only six years old with no library card and could only visit the children’s section. But he did not seem to care and walked confidently towards a teacher (who was a guide).
They had the following conversation:
“Miss, can you help me find “Plants vs Zombies: A Strategy Guide”?”
“I’m afraid we have no such book. Sorry, kid. I’m a library guide.”
“Or you can tell me the serial number of the “Plants vs Zombies” series and I will look it up by myself.”
“Serial number?”
“Yup, that is the serial number glued to the book spine, or QR code at the bottom of the endpaper.”
“…”

I hurriedly walked up to the guide and explained that my son thought it was a school library. In the school library, a bar code is glued to the endpaper of each book to facilitate book borrowing.

I was astonished by the incident. Back in 1995 when I was studying in secondary school and visited the provincial library for the first time, I did not have the faintest idea about serial codes, endpapers and book spines – I was simply dazed when I saw a sea of books. Now, setting foot in this library with which he was unfamiliar, my son was not lost. He knew what book he was looking for and even how to find it. Although he did not find what he wanted, he knew how to find books and the procedure for borrowing books. This is something I could not do when I was a teenager.

Of course, children are children, and by the time he returned home, my son seemed to have forgotten what had happened in the national library, and he just said to his granny: the library in Tianjin (he couldn’t even distinguish between Beijing and Tianjin) did not have “Plants vs Zombies: A Strategy Guide” and was no match for the little bookshop right opposite to the school; in the future, we do not have to travel so far to buy books anymore.

Children’s words are jocular; however, I found that learning is like the green grass in spring – it grows day by day without us noticing it.
Parents Chapter
Tunxilu Primary School
Wei Jianan(Mother)
(Primary 1 Class (5))
How Being a Parent
Volunteer Changed My Life


I am a parent volunteer at the library of Tunxilu Primary School. Although I have only been doing this work for one semester, the experience has been truly rewarding as I was able to find out what books children enjoyed to read.

All along, I followed a certain standard in dictating the kinds of books that my son should read – basically, I would go to the bookshop and select specific books for him so he would not read anything off the right track. But no matter how much caution I took, in the end he still became obsessed with “Ultraman”, “Plants vs Zombies”, “The Avengers”, “The Monster Tactic Manual”, etc., all of which were books I found inappropriate. I became so furious that I prohibited my son from buying any more books of this kind!

During the six months when I worked as a parent volunteer at the school library, I noticed that what seemed like good books to me simply stayed on the shelves almost untouched, whereas what I considered “wrong” books were wearing out due to frequent use. I encountered the following scene frequently while I was volunteering. Some senior boys would sit on the floor to discuss weird case investigation tactics used in the “Sherlock Holmes” collection; or how Harry Potter managed to overcome hurdles with the help of his good friends in order to protect the gemstone to save the world; or how the four little companions in Charlie IX plucked up their courage in face of difficulties and solved one mystery and case after another … Are these the things that every boy is interested in? I read two volumes of the Harry Potter series, trying to change my perceptions and understand the world of these boys who liked reading the “wrong” books. It was indeed very colorful, mysterious and most importantly, very attractive.

Now, to use children’s words: the prohibition is released! There is no such thing as “wrong” books in reading – one should simply read what interests them and not just for the sake of it.
Books are good teachers, but they are also our good friends – friends who see us grow and stay with us from young to old.